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Rings Movie Review

Rings Movie Review Horror Film

Rings Movie Review Horror Film

When Gore Verbinski’s 2002 film The Ring hit theaters, the success of his terrifying adaptation of director Hideo Nakata’s Japanese horror classic spawned a wave of American remakes of “J-horror” films. The ghostly girl with long dark hair, who crawls out of the television, is not scary anymore. You want to shave her head and tell her that Phoebe’s artwork in ‘Friends’ was more terrifying. Nothing about Samara intrigues you so it’s time the makers let her evil character rest in peace. You’d rather see her hilarious parody in the Scary Movies.

Rings Movie Review Horror Film
Rings Movie Review Horror Film

Rings Movie Review A Disappointing, Dud Horror Film

The story involves the same old tape, only this time the upgrade has been made from VHS to digital file. Samara, the terrifying spirit of the girl has re-coded her curse and it now haunts anybody who watches the tape and fails to show it to some other person within 7 days. The movie, isn’t scary, doesn’t live up to the legacy, and it doesn’t nudge you to think of technology in a new way. But it does make you wish that you could rewind those two hours, or maybe just erase them and go for original Japanese Ringu instead.

‘RINGS’ TRAILER TAKES THE HORROR FRANCHISE TO CREEPY NEW HEIGHTS

         Paramount Pictures has released a new trailer for its upcoming horror sequel Rings. The movie once again centers around a cursed video tape that kills viewers within seven days, first seen in the Japanese film Ring, released in 1998. The film isn’t the only resurrection of a major horror franchise that’s scheduled to hit this year. In September, Blair Witch will attempt to bring back the series that popularized found footage, while June saw the Japanese release of a movie where Kayako Saeki of The Grudge is pitted against Sadako Yamamura of The Ring.

Rings: Circle of strifek

There’s a VHS tape. Labelled with a scrawl that reads, ‘watch me’. And for the sake of its The Ring franchise, Hollywood has been making sure naive white people on screen have been dutifully carrying out that task, and in the process, as a Blues song says, going where they shouldn’t go, being who they shouldn’t be and doing what they shouldn’t do.

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